Profile

Introduction

Croquet at St. Boniface Museum

Croquet played on the front lawn during a 2005 exhibit featuring sports traditions of the Francophones and the Métis of Manitoba.

Le Musée de Saint-Boniface Museum collects, preserves, researches, and interprets a collection of artifacts relating to Western Canada’s French-Canadian and Métis heritage, while acknowledging the historical contributions of the First Nations and the religious communities. The Museum aims to provide visitors and students with experiences that will encourage greater awareness, appreciation and understanding of the French-Canadian and Métis cultures in Manitoba.

Built between 1845 and 1851, this former Grey Nuns’ convent houses the Museum and is in fact its principal artifact. It is the oldest remaining structure in the city of Winnipeg and the largest oak log building in North America. The first hospital in Western Canada, the building is also a symbol of the 19th century missionary effort carried out in the West by the Grey Nuns and other Catholic communities from their St. Boniface base.

Mission

The Musée de Saint Boniface Museum safeguards the history and heritage of French-Canadian and Métis people in Manitoba as a mirror for the community and a window for others. The Museum collects, preserves, researches and interprets artifacts of significance to French-Canadian and Métis people to further understanding of our contribution to the development of the Province of Manitoba.

Vision

Le Musée de Saint Boniface Museum shall be known as an indispensable point of reference for those wishing to learn about the heritage of French-Canadian and Métis peoples in Manitoba.

Visitors

The Museum currently hosts 14-15,000 visitors annually. They represent a broad spectrum ranging from researchers and school and university students to Canadians from other provinces, and American and other international tourists. As well, an increasing number of local visitors are discovering the Museum and the building for the first time despite their relative proximity.

Great write-up about the Saint-Boniface Museum building HERE!